Jamaica Finest”BOOBA STARR”

 

Dane Salmon aka “Booba Starr” was born on November 6 in Kingston, Jamaica where he spent his early childhood before his parents moved to the Greater Portmore area of St. Catherine. Booba interests in music began in high school when he started writing poems and songs and began to entertained friends and family. Shortly after leaving high school, Booba Starr’s interests in music took on a more serious tone as he began to hone his skills and talent by performing on the “Hard Drive sound system; it was this experience that gave him the confidence and the awakening that he wanted to entertain people through music.

Booba Starr is musically influenced by the great reggae artists of the eighties and nineties as well as greatest group of them all, Bob Marley and the Wailers. With his immense talent and versatility, Booba covers a wide range of styles across the reggae spectrum ranging from today’s contemporary reggae to the old school classic of the eighties and nineties. Whether dancehall, Roots, or Culture, Booba Starr easily transition from one to the next without skipping a beat.

2010, Booba Starr was introduced to Trevor “TC” Clarke, producer and owner of Jafrika Records, who produced his first single “Things Change”. During that same period, Booba Starr also produced other recordings with other producers.

2011, Booba Starr invested in his own recording studio and began to record his own music; he also started, along with fellow artist “Jami Dred”, to collaborate with the Austrian Record Label “Lyrical War Records”. Booba also voiced “Roll Out” on the “Bomb Weh Riddim” which was produced by Dimmie Joe Muzik & G5 Entertainment. He has voiced several singles, “Neva Easy”, “Prison Neva mek fi Dawg” and “From Dusk Till Dawn” for Sweat Boxx Productions which were produced by Julius Mitchell.

Booba Starr latest single “Hackle Di Body” is produce by Deon Gray for the Jafrika Label.Inspired by The Most High King Selassie I and life experience, Booba Starr has matured as an individual and a musician.

Booba Starr is a tired less warrior who looks forward to a bright and promising future in the music industry as performer and producer. With his confidence, determination, hard work, and guidance from Jah, Booba Starr will definitely be a major force in Reggae music for years to come.

Follow Up>http://www.ifetop10.com/2018/08/10/booba-starr-triumphs-again-ifetop10/ 


Videos


Interviews

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Plf7eJtNZOs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKasWHT-vFE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n50Dd3pO7tc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwCkTHhS36o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkLMmEuUwfU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8aD21pzVuw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0RbusTjSK8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNLS1LMvScs


Download Link

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/q2petnev78bwe2h/AACsy2ijdY_sHRtT17HTFpUKa?dl=0

Connect With Booba Starr On:

http://Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/Booba_Starr Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Booba%20Star… Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Starr%20Team… Soundcloud:

http://soundcloud.com/Booba starr Instagram:

http://instagram.com/Booba_starr

 

Poor People Defender Reggae Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer & Vocalist”CHUCK FENDA”

BBC Review…

Chuck Fenda (born Leshorn Whitehead, in Brooklyn) first came to prominence in Jamaica when recording with King Jammy in the late 90s. At the start of the new century he embraced Rastafarianism and aligned with 5th Element records, who released his debut Better Days in 2004.

The harsh-voiced deejay’s third album, Fulfilment, is a somewhat mellower affair than 2007’s The Living Fire. But with the 2009 world economy still reeling, the Poor People Defenda’s messages of spirituality and social justice are more powerful and pertinent than ever.

The Living Fire contained controversial single Gash Dem an Lite Dem, which despite radio bans (for allegedly inciting vigilantism) was a huge success. His coarse vocals (not dissimilar to Sizzla in pitch) and crude yet effective imagery will be an acquired taste for more refined ears, but this new effort is a solid grower of a record that benefits from a single producer’s touch.

This record’s comparative mellowness is mainly the result of the rhythms, supplied almost entirely by producer Kemar McGregor. McGregor’s take on the one-drop is considerably slicker and less bass-heavy than fans of bygone eras of roots reggae will be used to. Yet it is this contrast between his catchy, lovingly-created backings and Fenda’s brash, pained invective that helps the album succeed.

Chuck opens with mission statement I Am for the Poor on McGregor’s new Ghetto rhythm. The sufferers’ themes continue with Heights (using the ’83 rhythm) and Survivor (on the Rocksteady) before a switch to horticulture for Herbalist Farmer (over the Drop It).

Shane Brown, who worked on The Living Fire, contributes his synth-string-driven Nylon rhythm for It’s Getting Serious. Other guests include the angelic I Wayne on the ballad Thin Line; the deep voiced Bushman on Tough Time; and basic dancehall veteran Sammy Dread with a recut of his hit M16, renamed Bad Boy.

For the final act Fenda shows his tender side. The set’s only love song, Girl You Make Me Cry, is made all the more poignant by his strained delivery. Two prayer pieces, Why Should I and Our Father, conclude a rewarding listen.

iew…

Page Link>http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/reviews/8czb/

 


Videos

 

 

Connect with Chuck Fenda:

YouTube>https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaGgdfaC9SAaE9Xp4RcArig

Facebook>https://www.facebook.com/chuck.fenda/photos

Twitter>https://twitter.com/iamchuckfenda

Instagram>https://www.instagram.com/chuck_fenda/

LinkedIn> https://www.linkedin.com/in/nightnurse-berlin-53b8309b/